General Appraisal Information

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Appraisal Process

  • Why appraise a property?

An appraisal is the method established by the Kansas statute to determine a property owner’s share of taxes that support schools, roads, health and human services, parks, police and fire. 

  • How is an appraisal determined?

The county appraiser is required to visit your property at least once every six years. First, the appraiser will attempt to interview the property owner. Then an exterior inspection is completed. The appraiser will look for changes such as additions, deck constructions, verify dimensions, check for structural damage and determine the property’s general condition. Next, the appraiser uses computer-generated data to analyze the property characteristics. Sales data is also reviewed and analyzed. 

  • What is a Valuation Notice?

The first of March each year, the county appraiser mails Valuation Notices to each owner of real estate in the county. This letter provides the current and previous two-year history of your property’s valuation.

  • What if I believe my appraisal is too high?

If you believe your appraisal is inaccurate you have the opportunity to appeal the value.  Instructions of the appeal process are provided on the back of the Valuation Notice you received in the mail. 

Appeal Process

  • Should I appeal my valuation?

If you believe the appraised value of your property is more than you would reasonably receive if you were to sell that property you should consider an appeal.

  • How do I file an appeal?

You have two options to appeal your property’s value.

  1. Appealing the Valuation Notice
  2. Payment Under Protest

Instructions of the appeal process can be found on the back of the Valuation Notice you received in the mail.
By law, you must file your appeal 30 days subsequent to the date of the mailing of the valuation notice (KSA 79-1448).

  • Appealing the Valuation Notice

The first opportunity you have to appeal your property value is when you receive your Valuation Notice in March. You can appeal your notice by contacting the County Appraiser’s Office. The appeal process begins with an informal meeting with the County Appraiser’s Office. At this meeting, the County Appraiser will provide you with the documentation they used in support of the value they set for your property. This is your opportunity to provide the appraiser with documentation and explanation why you believe the value is inaccurate.

  • Payment Under Protest

The second option if you believe your property value is too high is to complete the Payment Under Protest form with the County Treasurer at the time you receive your tax statement. Again, the appeal process begins with an informal meeting with the County Appraiser’s Office. At this meeting, the County Appraiser will provide you with the documentation they used in support of the value they set for your property. This is your opportunity to provide the appraiser with documentation and explanation why you believe the value is inaccurate.

FAQ

  • Why are my taxes so high?

If you are concerned about the amount of your tax bill but feel the value of your property is accurate, please contact your city council, school board, county commissioner or any other taxing authority that create budgets and set mill levies. The mill levy directly affects the amount of your property tax.

  • What is meant by “fair market value”?

Fair market value means the amount, in terms of money, that a well-informed buyer is willing to pay and a well-informed seller is willing to accept for the property in an open and competitive market, assuming that the parties are acting without undue compulsion.

  • What is the mill levy and how is it set?

The mill levy is the tax rate that is applied to the assess value. In general terms, the mill levy is determined by the diving the dollars need for local services by the taxable assessed value in the service area.

  • Will the value of my property change every year?

The value of your property may change each year, it is all dependent on market conditions, improvements to your property, etc. The County Appraiser continually updated sale prices and other information on properties throughout the entire county.

  • How does the county’s appraisal affect my taxes?

If your property value goes up, it does not necessarily mean you will pay more taxes. Likewise, if your property value goes down or does not change, it does not automatically mean you will pay less or the same amount of taxes. Changes in property taxes are based in large part on how much your local government decides to spend on services each year.

  • How do I calculate the property taxes on my property?

Looking at your notice of value, find the "appraised value" of your property. Multiply the appraised value by the "assessment percentage" for your property.  ___ (appraised value) times ___% (assessment percentage) = assessed value

Multiply the assessed value by your "mill levy" and then divide by 1,000 to estimate the property tax you owe. ___ (assessed value) times ___ (mill levy) divided by 1,000 = tax bill

Contact the County Clerk to find out your mil levy.

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